What is Life Coaching

Life Coach vs. Leadership/Executive Coach

A life coach generally works with an individual on a personal level. They may help clients understand personal goals and objectives and discover the things are holding them back in their effort to meet these goals and objectives and ultimately create a life in alignment with their values. The life coach often helps clients find balance in their lives, build positive relationships or improve their outlook. Success in this coaching relationship is measured by the happiness and fulfillment of the client. The coaching agenda is not mixed with a business agenda, life coaching is all about the individual.

Life Coach vs.Therapist

One of the most common misconceptions about life coaching is that it is therapy in disguise — or, worse yet, therapy from an unlicensed practitioner. In reality, life coaching is truly its own unique service designed to help ambitious achievers meet the outcomes that will bring them success and fulfillment. Here are some of the differences between life coaching and therapy, and a basic guide for when each service is appropriate.

Counseling vs. Life Coaching

The relationship between professional counselors and life coaches is sometimes akin to that of stepsiblings. They are loosely connected because they share the same family name — “helping professional.” And because of that name, those outside the “family” sometimes link the two (like it or not).
However, like stereotypical stepsiblings, although counselors and life coaches are familiar with each other and even share some similar traits, they are sometimes prone to less positive feelings of competition and, at times, distrust.

There is, however, often a larger divide when the discussion turns to how coaching and counseling are defined and what each profession offers.
Coaching advocates say they provide a distinct service that helps clients work on their goals for the future and create a new life path. They say counselors spend more time examining the past, looking for solutions to emotional concerns and seeking a diagnosis required by insurance companies. Coaches suggest that the relationships they establish with clients are also more collegial in nature. Coaches and clients work in a less structured environment as a team rather than setting up a “doctor-patient” relationship.